Developing the path for language learner through art based learning

Because the left and right hemispheres of the brain are mirror images of each other, each specializing in something different, it makes sense that the educational paths for left- and right-brained learners are opposites of each other. The time frame that schools utilize in teaching various subjects aligns with the left-brained learner stages of learning. I have identified the time frames of three stages of learning, depicted in the charts below. This chapter introduces the function of each stage while Chapter Seven provides details for the content and subject expression.

Developing the path for language learner through art based learning

How do we get people to understand programming? Khan Academy recently launched an online environment for learning to program. It offers a set of tutorials based on the JavaScript and Processing languages, and features a "live coding" environment, where the program's output updates as the programmer types.

Because my work was cited as an inspiration for the Khan system, I felt I should respond with two thoughts about learning: Programming is a way of thinking, not a rote skill. Learning about "for" loops is not learning to program, any more than learning about pencils is learning to draw.

People understand what they can see. If a programmer cannot see what a program is doing, she can't understand it. Thus, the goals of a programming system should be: JavaScript and Processing are poorly-designed languages that support weak ways of thinking, and ignore decades of learning about learning.

And live coding, as a standalone feature, misses the point. Alan Perlis wrote, "To understand a program, you must become both the machine and the program. A person is not a machine, and should not be forced to think like one.

We turn it into something that's understandable by people. Contents The concept of a system split between the computer and the head was derived from Will Wright's thoughts on games.

A programming system has two parts. The programming "environment" is the part that's installed on the computer.

Developing the path for language learner through art based learning

The programming "language" is the part that's installed in the programmer's head. This essay presents a set of design principles for an environment and language suitable for learning.

The environment should allow the learner to: The features are not the point We often think of a programming environment or language in terms of its features -- this one "has code folding", that one "has type inference".

This is like thinking about a book in terms of its words -- this book has a "fortuitous", that one has a "munificent". What matters is not individual words, but how the words together convey a message.

Likewise, a well-designed system is not simply a bag of features. A good system is designed to encourage particular ways of thinking, with all features carefully and cohesively designed around that purpose.

This essay will present many features! The trick is to see through them -- to see the underlying design principles that they represent, and understand how these principles enable the programmer to think.

Read the vocabulary

Read the vocabulary Here is a simple tutorial program that a learner might face: For the sake of comparison, the examples here will use the same languages as the Khan Academy system, JavaScript and Processing.

Before a reader can make any sense of this code, before she can even begin to understand how it works, here are some questions she will have: What does "fill" mean?

What do those numbers after "fill" mean? What do those numbers after "ellipse" mean? What units are these numbers in?

Frequently bought together

What ranges are they in? Why are there so many numbers? Khan Academy's tutorials encourage the learner to address these questions by randomly adjusting numbers and trying to figure out what they do. Imagine if you bought a new microwave, took it out of the box, and found a panel of unlabeled buttons.Developing a Structured Learning Path.

By. Bryant Nielson, Publisher and Managing Editor/05/ 0. Facebook. Twitter. Google+. Pinterest. WhatsApp. One of the most effective ways to engage training participants and ensure retention is through the creation of structured learning paths.

Using a structured approach gives participants an. Abstract. Until quite recently, computer-assisted language learning (CALL) was a topic of relevance mostly to those with a special interest in that area. This is because many languages simply borrow English words and integrate them into the new language with altered pronunciation or stress.

So to make my life easy when I start learning a language, one of the first word lists I try to consume is a list of “cognates,” or “English loan words,” which can be found quickly for pretty much any language. Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum.

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum. Study Hacks Blog Decoding Patterns of Success How to Ace Calculus: The Art of Doing Well in Technical Courses November 14th, · comments Tangent Troubles.

Calculus .

Developing the path for language learner through art based learning

A. A1C A form of hemoglobin used to test blood sugars over a period of time. ABCs of Behavior An easy method for remembering the order of behavioral components: Antecedent, Behavior, Consequence.

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