A literary analysis of orange as a lesbian novel

Thomas Langdon Oonya Kempadoo grew up in Guyana and has worked and lived in various Caribbean islands and currently resides in Grenada.

A literary analysis of orange as a lesbian novel

I greatly support its address of queer and trans issues.

Literature

The WoC in the show each possess their own deeply moving stories. Yet, what is needed to bring them to the forefront is a WASP protagonist who appropriates WoC stories for television audiences.

Were the stories of WoC not interesting enough alone? Why are WoC not protagonists in a show where they drive the humor and the most gripping emotional storylines? They are presented as boisterous, aggressive characters who serve— in a rather dehumanizing manner— as comic relief.

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They fantasize about fried chicken, teach the naive, white protagonist Piper how to fight, and utilize intimidation and scare tactics on other inmates. Taystee astutely raises issues of surveillance by the state, the impossibility of finding jobs, and her lack of a support system outside as reasons why she re-offended.

These reasons ultimately drove her back into prison where she declares that at least she has a bed, a prison job, and friends. Socio-economic and race issues are either ignored or not sufficiently addressed in the show.

Meanwhile, the point of entry for many women of color into the criminal justice system stems from being severely abused by a boyfriend or another trusted figure, being forced into the sex trade, coerced into becoming drug mules, or these women are forced to commit crimes out of necessity to feed their Black and Brown babies.

Reality is less about WoC choices than it is about WoC socio-economic destinies.

Studies, for example, show that PoC are four times more likely to be arrested for the possession of marijuana than whites. The WoC are shown to care more about the free doughnuts and coffee.

Nevertheless, the portrayal of Piper as the only woman able or willing to rise up against the unjust prison system is largely ahistorical.

A literary analysis of orange as a lesbian novel

Although the WoC are depicted as passive and apathetic to prison reform, history has shown their integral role in prison movements.

We see this constantly in modern American culture. It provides a relative voice for trans and queer issues and acts as a minimal outlet for WoC issues. However, the Black and Latina experiences are diluted through myopic stereotypes and racist tropes. As a show depicting largely WoC stories, it centers disproportionately around an archetypical white character, and this does no favors for women of color.

Although we learn much from the stories of each women—whether WoC or not—the white female protagonist remains the appropriating factor of the show. It is time for us to finally do away with white authentication of the PoC experience.The 14 best sex scenes in literature. The book: Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit By Jeanette Winterson (which was adapted for the BBC in ) The scene: Protagonist Jeanette, raised by her super.

Nov 04,  · From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ A Clockwork Orange Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. A Clockwork Orange . Literary Elements have an inherent existence in literary piece and are extensively employed by writers to develop a literary piece e.g.

plot, setting, narrative structure, characters, mood, theme, moral etc. Writers simply cannot create his desired work without including Literary Elements in a thoroughly professional manner.

I acclaim Anthony Burgess's new novel as the curiosity of the day. A Clockwork Orange is told in the first person.

A literary analysis of orange as a lesbian novel

That is the extent of its resemblance to anything much else, though a hasty. Free textual analysis papers, essays, and research papers. Oranges are Not the Only Fruit quiz that tests what you know. Perfect prep for Oranges are Not the Only Fruit quizzes and tests you might have in school.

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